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Pandemic Fatigue: How To Stay Mentally Healthy In The Covid Era

As 2020 draws to a close, many of us are experiencing pandemic fatigue. We’re all tired of wearing masks and social distancing. Most of us just want to go back to traveling, enjoying time with family and friends, and the normal world we used to know. This is the time when it is so important for our mental health that we keep a positive outlook and not allow boredom and pessimism to creep in.

Often, when we get closer to the end of a trying period in our lives, there is the temptation to give up. After all, going through long stretches of a challenge can make it seem as if we are not making progress. In the case of the pandemic, isolation from our friends and family coupled with fear of getting sick and concern for loved ones just adds to our anxiety and stress.

Signs Of Pandemic Fatigue

Our emotions have been running on high alert for months now. Living under this elevated level of awareness without a break means we’re always in fight-or-flight made, resulting in pandemic fatigue.

Signs of pandemic fatigue can take several forms, including:

  • No motivation
  • Feeling hopeless
  • Not sleeping well or sleeping too much
  • Feeling irritable or on edge
  • Overindulging in unhealthy foods or skipping meals altogether
  • Substance abuse or increased use of alcohol, recreational drugs, etc.

What Can I Do To Feel Better If I Am Anxious And Scared About Covid-19?

If you feel like you are constantly on edge or overly worried about the pandemic, know that you are not alone. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that, “Symptoms of anxiety disorder and depressive disorder increased considerably in the United States during April–June of 2020, compared with the same period in 2019.”

This pandemic has not only brought disease to our front doors, it has given us other things to cope with, as well. Many of us are dealing with job loss and/or grieving the loss of loved ones. We may have new or worsening relationship challenges or financial concerns. Dealing with a pandemic is one thing, but adding these other stressors makes it much more difficult to cope. Be kind to yourself during this time.

One of the most helpful things you can do is to disconnect or limit your social media feeds and news reports. The constant news coverage of death tolls and illness can be demoralizing and social media posts can drive those fears to new levels. It’s enough to make us despair of ever getting our old lives back.

We recommend that you set a time limit for watching the news or reading news stories. In addition, set a goal that you’ll only check them once a day.

Likewise, we suggest backing off on your social media time and limiting your interaction to once a day for a reasonable amount of time. You may feel more anxious at first due to fear of missing out, but stick with it and you’ll soon see the positive results.

Another important thing to do is to stay connected to loved ones and friends, particularly those whom you trust with your concerns. Video chats and phone calls can help reduce feelings of isolation and loneliness. They can also be great distractions.

Set a routine. Keeping to schedule sounds boring, but the structure it provides can help keep us from sliding further into our fears and depression. For example, if you maintain a meal schedule, you are less likely to skip a meal, which can add to your depression.

Try to distract yourself. Activities like meditation, mindfulness, and other relaxation techniques or writing in a gratitude journal can help to keep negative thoughts at bay. Likewise, scheduling time to exercise or get outdoors will contribute to positive emotions.

Now is a great time to learn a new skill, start a new hobby (or work on a current one) or take up a musical instrument. Indulging in something you enjoy takes you out of fear-based thoughts and provides a more meaningful outlook.

Covid Era Depression? We Are Here For You

If you are experiencing pandemic fatigue and covid-era depression, we are here to help. Contact The Center for Treatment of Anxiety and Mood Disorders in Delray Beach, Florida at 561-496-1094 or email Dr. Andrew Rosen and The Center today.

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