All Posts Tagged: south florida psychologists

Summer Camp Separation Anxiety – Tips for Reducing Child Anxiety

For many people, memories of going away to summer camp are some of the fondest they will ever have. Camp provides the opportunity to make new friends and share new adventures. When your child is going off to camp for the first time, however, fear of separation can make the experience seem dreadful for both parent and child, especially in the case of sleep-away camps.
           
Paying close attention to your child’s concerns is the first step in alleviating their anxiety. A child’s summer camp separation anxiety can display itself in a number of ways, including:

  • Unrealistic fear that someone close to them will be harmed while they are away
  • Reluctance to attend the camp
  • Persistent avoidance of being left alone
  • Nightmares involving themes of separation
  • Physical complaints when separated
  • Excessive distress when separation is anticipated

Repeated physical complaints can also be a sign of summer camp separation anxiety. These symptoms could be any of the following:

  • Stomach problems
  • Headaches
  • Cold or clammy hands
  • Nausea
  • Feeling faint
  • Being hot or cold

Fortunately, there are plenty of tips to help parents reduce their child’s separation anxiety. Parents are encouraged to:

  • Remind their child that everyone gets nervous when they go away to camp, especially if it’s their first time
  • Show confidence that they’ll enjoy their time away
  • Remind them about other new experiences they’ve overcome in the past
  • Find out how the camp deals with homesickness so you can be prepared
  • Provide your child with pre-addressed, stamped envelopes, pen, and paper so they can write home whenever they want
  • Provide lots of attention in the days preceding the separation
  • Make goodbyes short and to the point. Dragging them out can make both parties nervous and delay the possibility of moving past the anxiety.

In most cases, the above steps will go a long way in eliminating or reducing separation anxiety that arises before a sleep-away summer camp. In some situations, however, the anxiety may persist despite all efforts. In this instance, parents are encouraged to seek professional help, especially if the child’s symptoms have begun to interfere with their school performance or friends. For more information on summer camp separation anxiety, contact child anxiety therapist Dr. Andrew Rosen at 561-496-1094 or email him today.

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Bin Laden’s Death And Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

In recent days, the nation has been captivated by the shocking news that Osama bin Laden, the al-Qaeda leader responsible for planning the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, was killed by an elite team of U.S. Navy SEALS. September 11, 2001 will stand in memory as one of the most horrific events to take place on American soil. It has been responsible for one of the largest epidemics of post traumatic stress the United States has ever seen and the news of bin Laden’s death is sure to have an impact on that.

To understand the affects of this news, you must first understand the basics of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Trauma occurs when a person has experienced, witnessed, or been confronted with a terrible event or injury. The threat of a life or death situation to themselves or others can produce the same result. Of course, it is normal to experience a strong reaction after such an event but when Post Traumatic Stress Disorder occurs, it is because the victim has experienced PTSD symptoms for at least a month with dramatic impact to their everyday life.

The symptoms of PTSD include:

  • Re-experiencing the trauma
  • Persistent avoidance
  • Increased state of arousal

Now, with the death of Osama bin Laden, there is a complicated array of emotions that may affect victims of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder in a multitude of ways. For some, it may:

  • Dredge up old feelings and the risk of a relapse
  • Heighten their PTSD out of anxiety that bin Laden’s death could provoke retaliation from radical Islamic groups
  • Bring a sense of closure similar to hearing a guilty verdict at a murder trial

No matter what side of the coin you’re on, the good news will always be that PTSD can be controlled with the proper treatment. Treatment may include individual psychotherapy, Cognitive Behavior Therapy, medicine, or peer group support. If you or someone you know is suffering from this disorder, seeking help can get you back on the path to a normal life.

For more information and help for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder in the South Florida area, contact Boca Raton Post Traumatic Stress Disorder therapist Dr. Andrew Rosen at 561-496-1094 or email him today.

 

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Expectations of Beauty – Body Image Disorder

It is natural for most people to feel some level of self-consciousness regarding their appearance in the presence of others. But for some, this concern rises past an unhealthy level and develops into a chronic mental condition known as Body Dysmorphic Disorder or Body Image Disorder. People who suffer from this disorder can’t stop thinking about a flaw in their appearance that may be either minor or imagined. For victims of this disorder, this minor or imagined flaw seems so shameful they don’t want to be seen by anyone.

Signs of Body Dysmorphic Disorder may include:

  • Preoccupation with physical appearance
  • Frequent examination in the mirror or, conversely, avoidance of mirrors
  • Belief that others take special notice of your appearance in a negative way
  • Extreme self-consciousness
  • Constantly seeking cosmetic procedures to “fix” perceived flaws without satisfaction
  • The need to seek reassurance about your appearance from others
  • Excessive grooming, such as hair plucking
  • Skin picking
  • Refusal to appear in pictures
  • Avoidance of social situations
  • The need to wear excessive makeup or clothing to hide perceived flaws

This condition, often referred to as “imagined ugliness,” can arise as a result of childhood teasing or societal expectations of beauty. For most people with Body Image Disorder, the majority of their attention focuses on one particular part of their body. This could be any bodily attribute, but some of the more commonly seen features include:

  • Nose
  • Hair
  • Skin
  • Complexion
  • Wrinkles
  • Acne and blemishes
  • Baldness
  • Breast size
  • Muscle size
  • Genitalia

Treatment for this condition often includes medication and cognitive behavioral therapy. However, left untreated, this condition can lead to suicidal thoughts and behavior, repeated hospitalizations, difficulty attending work or school, lack of self-esteem, obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression or mood disorders, social phobia, substance abuse, or a lack of close relationships. Because of these traumatic consequences, it is important to seek help if you or a loved one is impacted by the symptoms listed above.

For more information on Body Image Disorder and cognitive behavior therapy and/or medication in the Boca Raton, Florida area, contact South Florida anxiety disorder specialist Dr. Andrew Rosen at 561-496-1094 or email him today.

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