All Posts Tagged: phase of life adjustment anxiety

College Students: Why Are We Seeing an Increase in Psychological Disorders?

College is supposed to be the highlight of young adult lives. It represents a time for independence, new experiences, and carefree living before the “real world” and true responsibilities kick in. So why is it that today’s college students are so susceptible to so many mental health concerns?

The statistics related to psychological disorders and mental health concerns among college students have become so alarming that many are referring to it as a mental health crisis. The numbers speak for themselves:

  • 1 in 4 young adults between the ages of 18 and 24 have a diagnosable mental condition.
  • More than 64% of young adults who are no longer in college are no longer attending because of a mental health related reason.
  • Over 30% of students meet the criteria for an alcohol abuse diagnosis.
  • A 2006 survey showed nearly 20% of students had eating disorders whereas a study in the 1980s revealed only 4-5% of students with this concern.
  • The suicide rate for young adults ages 15-24 has tripled since the 1950s.
  • A 2013 survey found that 57% of college women and 40% of college men reported “overwhelming anxiety” in the year leading up to the study.
  • Students are facing college depression. The National Institute of Mental Health reports that, in 2011, the American College Health Association–National College Health Assessment (ACHA–NCHA—a nationwide survey of college students at 2- and 4-year institutions—found that about 30 % of college students reported feeling “so depressed that it was difficult to function” at some time in the past year.
  • 95% of college counseling center directors state that there are growing concerns on their campus with the number of students who demonstrate significant psychological problems.

What’s Different for Today’s College Student?

There has always been a certain amount of phase of life adjustment anxiety that goes along with leaving a familiar setting and going off to college. But, what could explain why the numbers associated with psychological concerns among college students have risen so greatly over recent years? Surely colleges have always had the same high standards with regard to homework and reports? While that may be true there are, in fact, quite a few factors that could be contributing to these statistical increases:

  • Technology – while one could argue that technology makes college student’s lives easier, it also provides high potential for chaos, information overload, and hyper-connectivity, which can all combine to create additional stress.
  • Lack of family structure – in today’s fast-paced, divorce-heavy world it can be challenging to find young adults who have a stable, reliable family system. When they’re thrust into the new realm of college living this lack of guidance and support can lead to increased mental health concerns.
  • Early education concerns – many studies show that students entering college today are not as prepared for it academically as they should be. Bridging that gap between their lack of knowledge and increased expectations of college versus high school can play a huge role in the psychological issues we see today.
  • Overprotective parents – in today’s world of participation trophies and overindulgent, parents, children are often not prepared to cope with disappointment or negative feedback. This can lead to them entering the college world completely unprepared for higher education’s normal challenges and the resiliency to adjust to them.
  • Economic pressures – high unemployment and a tough economic climate mean parents are less able to help their children with the financial responsibilities of college. Along with this comes an increase in students working in addition to school, and additional issues for them to worry about.

How Can You Help?

Today’s college student needs to understand that it’s okay to talk about the difficulties they’re facing. Even as society becomes more open to discussing mental health concerns there is still a lot of stigma attached to the subject and it can be scary for students to admit there’s a problem. As many of the above factors show, lack of structure and guidance also plays a big role in the psychological troubles of our students. Knowing they have support and understanding can give students a way to plant their feet in and work toward resolving their issues. Take time to help them learn how to prioritize and structure their new responsibilities so they can reduce the chaos that surrounds them.

In some situations, the best resolution will be to seek professional help. A therapist or other mental health professional can help students get to the root of their problems and provide coping techniques that will allow them to move confidently through the rest of their college years.

If you know a college student who is struggling with college phase of life adjustment anxiety or if you need help yourself, contact Dr. Andrew Rosen and The Center for Treatment of Anxiety and Mood Disorders in Delray Beach, Florida at 561-496-1094 or email Dr. Rosen and The Center today.

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Job Search Anxiety

In recent years our nation’s unemployment rate has reached unforeseen heights. This means unprecedented numbers of people are out there looking for a job and hoping they’re the lucky candidate to seep through the cracks. This also means a lot of rejection for people who may not be used to it.

With that rejection comes a higher possibility of employment seekers developing anxiety related to their job search as they transition through this new chapter of life. In fact, research shows that the longer people are unemployed, the greater the worry, sadness, and stress they experience and the greater the possibility of having phase of life adjustment anxiety . The chances of being admitted into a mental health hospital increase by 4% in people who are unemployed. If that wasn’t enough, research also shows that unemployment increases mortality by 1% and cardiovascular disease by 5-6%.

But what does anxiety on the job search front look like? Usually it comes with:

  • Headaches
  • High blood pressure
  • Stiffness in the neck and shoulders
  • Upset stomach
  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • People with anxiety are also more prone to illness or more likely to see an increase in pre-existing conditions.

Recent college graduates may have an even harder time with phase of life adjustment anxiety concerns during their job search. The weak job market can mean facing low job possibilities combined with a complete life transition and the addition of tuition repayments.

The most important thing to remember in all of these job search cases is to speak openly and honestly about the anxiety you’re facing. Friends, family members, even old teachers or colleagues can be great resources for a support system while you’re hunting for your new job. It’s important to realize that your anxiety can work for you or against you. At times, it may add excitement to the hunt and spur you on to better performances in interviews. In other cases, it could hinder your progress. Even though you know a job is necessary, the fear of rejection can make you avoid job opportunities.

If your anxiety has begun to negatively effect your job hunt you may want to seek help. For more information on the anxiety that goes with a job search and help for phase of life adjustment anxiety, contact Dr. Andrew Rosen and The Center for Treatment of Anxiety and Mood Disorder. You can reach us by calling 561-496-1094 or by emailing Dr. Rosen and The Center today.

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