All Posts Tagged: panic attacks

Panic Attacks and Panic Disorder

Stress is a natural part of life. We all go through it whether we want to or not. For some, it might arise with work or relationship troubles. For others, it might be develop while working toward an important goal or experiencing a life change. While we might be used to a touch of stress in our lives, most of us are not used to the panic attacks that sometime develop as a result of that stress.

A panic attack is a sudden episode of intense fear that occurs when there’s no real danger or apparent cause. It can trigger severe physical reactions and make you think you’re losing control, having a heart attack, or even dying. Stress is one of the biggest causes of panic attacks, but they can also occur as a result of:

  • Certain changes in the way your brain functions
  • Genetics
  • Major life changes
  • The death or serious illness of a loved one
  • Having a temperament that’s more susceptible to stress

Research shows that most of us will have one or two panic attacks in our lifetime. The symptoms of a panic attack include:

  • Rapid heart beat
  • Sweating
  • Trembling
  • Hyperventilation
  • Chills or hot flashes
  • Nausea
  • Chest or abdominal pain
  • Dizziness
  • Faintness

If you or someone you know has begun experiencing panic attacks on a regular basis, it’s important to seek help immediately. In many cases these attacks can get worse without help and are often difficult to manage on your own. If a person begins experiencing panic attacks regularly, they often begin changing their lifestyle to avoid the triggers that set off their attacks. This pattern of avoidance, combined with an increased anxiety level, leads to a condition known as panic disorder. The longer a panic disorder persists, the more likely you are to develop complications, such as:

  • Increased risk of suicide or suicidal thoughts
  • Development of phobias, such as a fear of leaving home
  • Depression
  • Alcohol or substance abuse

Cognitive-behavioral therapy is generally the most effective treatment for panic attacks and panic disorder. It helps the person focus on the behaviors and thinking patterns that are triggering the attacks. Exposure therapy (where the patient is exposed to the physical sensations of panic in a safe, controlled environment) is another treatment that has been very effective in treating panic disorder.

Don’t let panic attacks disrupt your life or impact your work, school, or family. For more information on panic attacks, panic disorders, or getting assistance for yourself or a loved one, contact Dr. Andrew Rosen and The Center for Treatment of Anxiety and Mood Disorders in Delray Beach, Florida. They can be reached by calling 561-496-1094 or by emailing Dr. Rosen and The Center today.

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Job Search Anxiety

In recent years our nation’s unemployment rate has reached unforeseen heights. This means unprecedented numbers of people are out there looking for a job and hoping they’re the lucky candidate to seep through the cracks. This also means a lot of rejection for people who may not be used to it.

With that rejection comes a higher possibility of employment seekers developing anxiety related to their job search as they transition through this new chapter of life. In fact, research shows that the longer people are unemployed, the greater the worry, sadness, and stress they experience and the greater the possibility of having phase of life adjustment anxiety . The chances of being admitted into a mental health hospital increase by 4% in people who are unemployed. If that wasn’t enough, research also shows that unemployment increases mortality by 1% and cardiovascular disease by 5-6%.

But what does anxiety on the job search front look like? Usually it comes with:

  • Headaches
  • High blood pressure
  • Stiffness in the neck and shoulders
  • Upset stomach
  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • People with anxiety are also more prone to illness or more likely to see an increase in pre-existing conditions.

Recent college graduates may have an even harder time with phase of life adjustment anxiety concerns during their job search. The weak job market can mean facing low job possibilities combined with a complete life transition and the addition of tuition repayments.

The most important thing to remember in all of these job search cases is to speak openly and honestly about the anxiety you’re facing. Friends, family members, even old teachers or colleagues can be great resources for a support system while you’re hunting for your new job. It’s important to realize that your anxiety can work for you or against you. At times, it may add excitement to the hunt and spur you on to better performances in interviews. In other cases, it could hinder your progress. Even though you know a job is necessary, the fear of rejection can make you avoid job opportunities.

If your anxiety has begun to negatively effect your job hunt you may want to seek help. For more information on the anxiety that goes with a job search and help for phase of life adjustment anxiety, contact Dr. Andrew Rosen and The Center for Treatment of Anxiety and Mood Disorder. You can reach us by calling 561-496-1094 or by emailing Dr. Rosen and The Center today.

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