All Posts Tagged: dr andrew rosen

For My Anxiety or Depression: Should I Use Medication or Therapy? (Webinar)

About the Webinar:

Dr. Andrew Rosen, Board Certified Psychologist, founder and director of the Center for Treatment of Anxiety and Mood Disorders and Dr. David Gross, Board Certified Psychiatrist, and medical director of the Center recently held a webinar on using medication versus therapy for anxiety and depression with The Anxiety and Depression Association of America. Some of the topics covered in the webinar include: What are the roles of medication and therapy? How can my psychiatrist (or primary care doctor) and my therapist work together as a team? How soon can I expect to see results from medication? How soon can I expect to see results from cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT)? Are there situations where medication and CBT can work great together?

 

Watch the webinar here:

Recorded on April 21, 2017 for the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (www.adaa.org) © ADAA 2017

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Where Will They Be in 10 Years? Exploring Residential and Therapeutic Options For Adolescents & Young Adults

About the Presentation:

Clinicians are often unaware of the range of residential options that exist nationally for their most challenging young clients. We will demystify the antiquated, often misunderstood assumptions about residential treatment programs. We’ll provide a deeper understanding of the options clinicians can propose to their adolescent and young adult patients who need a more intensive milieu.

When:

Tuesday, March 21, 2017
9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Where:

Center for Treatment of Anxiety and Mood Disorders
4600 Linton Blvd, Ste 320
Delray Beach, FL 33445

Register Here

About the Presenters:

Marcy Dorfman, LCSW
Therapeutic Educational Consultant
 

Marcy is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and Therapeutic Educational Consultant. Having treated families clinically, both in agencies and in twenty years of private practice, she recognized the need to work with a Therapeutic Educational Consultant for her own son, then 14, because he was not progressing in outpatient therapy to the extent he needed to reach his full potential. Now working to assist and guide families through the vast array of available options, she travels throughout the country to pinpoint the finest schools and programs based on their programming, staff, and clinical reputation. She shares her invaluable knowledge with parents who are in need of expert advice and direction.

 

 

About Josh Watson, LCSW
Chief Marketing Officer, Aspiro Adventure Therapy
 

Josh completed graduate studies at the University of Georgia and is currently a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Utah and North Carolina. He is a co-founder and Chief Marketing Officer for Aspiro, a Wilderness Adventure Therapy program based in Sandy, Utah. Josh has spent over 15 years of his professional career in the research, development and implementation of effective treatment strategies for both adolescent and young adult populations presenting with mixed emotional, behavioral, and learning challenges. Since the conception of Aspiro in 2005, Josh and the Aspiro Group have successfully developed five additional partner programs in Utah, North Carolina and Costa Rica that each serve different client profiles.

 

Andrew Taylor, CSUDC
Founder & Executive Director, Pure Life by Aspiro

A native of Utah, Andrew grew up in the outdoors and spent his college summers as a river guide on the Upper Colorado River. After graduating from the University of Utah with a degree in Organizational Communication, Andrew went to Costa Rica in search of white water. During his time in Costa Rica, he fell in love with the Costa Rican people and the wide range of adventure activities the country has to offer. Andrew has been running adventure trips in Costa Rica since 2004. He’s rafted and kayaked in rivers all over the world, including Costa Rica, New Zealand, and Venezuela. He has been inspired and fulfilled by his work with individuals suffering from drug and alcohol addictions at Cirque Lodge, one of the top substance abuse programs in the nation.

 

Register Here

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Separation Anxiety and School Refusal

The summer is waning – it’s almost time for autumn to roll around again, which means school will be starting soon. While most children look forward to this time so they can see their friends and enjoy various school activities, this can be a period of major anxiety for some school-aged children. These kids are extremely unwilling to leave home or be away from major attachment figures such as parents, grandparents, or older siblings. The beginning of the new school year is often seen as a threat to them, resulting in elevated anxiety levels and possible school-related disorders, such as separation anxiety disorder and school refusal.

In some cases the separation anxiety and school refusal follow an infection or illness or can come after an emotional trauma such as a move to another neighborhood or the death of a loved one. The anxiety generally occurs after the child has spent an extended time with their parent or loved one, perhaps over summer break or a long vacation.

Anxiety Definition

A teen or child is said to be suffering from a separation anxiety disorder if they show excessive anxiety related to the separation from a parent or caregiver or from their home, or if they exhibit an inappropriate anxiety about this separation as related to their age or stage of development. School refusal and separation anxiety are not the same: school refusal is not an “actual” diagnosis, instead it is a result of the child or teen having a separation anxiety disorder, panic disorder, post traumatic stress disorder, or social phobia, among other diagnoses.

Separation Anxiety Physical Symptoms

Children with separation anxiety have symptoms which can include:

  • Excessive worry about potential harm befalling oneself or one’s caregiver
  • Demonstrating clingy behavior
  • Avoiding activities that may result in separation from parents
  • Fearing to be alone in a room or needing to see a parent at all times
  • Difficulty going to sleep, fear of the dark, and/or nightmares
  • Trembling
  • Headaches
  • Stomachaches and/or nausea
  • Vomiting

A child who exhibits three or more of these symptoms for more than four weeks is likely to be suffering from a separation anxiety disorder.

Treatment for School Refusal and Separation Anxiety

When treating a child with separation anxiety and school refusal, therapists try to help the child learn to identify and change their anxious thoughts. They teach coping mechanisms that will help the child respond less fearfully to the situations that produce their anxiety. This can be done through role-playing or by modeling the appropriate behavior for the child to see. Medication is sometimes appropriate in severe cases of separation anxiety. Additionally, the therapist encourages child to use positive self-talk and parents help with this therapy by actively reinforcing positive behaviors and rewarding their child’s successes.

Have Questions? Need Help?

To get more information and help for child anxiety, separation anxiety and school refusal, please contact Dr. Andrew Rosen and The Center for Treatment of Anxiety and Mood Disorders in Delray Beach, Florida at 561-496-1094 or email Dr. Rosen and The Center today.

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Summer Camp Separation Anxiety – Tips for Reducing Child Anxiety

For many people, memories of going away to summer camp are some of the fondest they will ever have. Camp provides the opportunity to make new friends and share new adventures. When your child is going off to camp for the first time, however, fear of separation can make the experience seem dreadful for both parent and child, especially in the case of sleep-away camps.
           
Paying close attention to your child’s concerns is the first step in alleviating their anxiety. A child’s summer camp separation anxiety can display itself in a number of ways, including:

  • Unrealistic fear that someone close to them will be harmed while they are away
  • Reluctance to attend the camp
  • Persistent avoidance of being left alone
  • Nightmares involving themes of separation
  • Physical complaints when separated
  • Excessive distress when separation is anticipated

Repeated physical complaints can also be a sign of summer camp separation anxiety. These symptoms could be any of the following:

  • Stomach problems
  • Headaches
  • Cold or clammy hands
  • Nausea
  • Feeling faint
  • Being hot or cold

Fortunately, there are plenty of tips to help parents reduce their child’s separation anxiety. Parents are encouraged to:

  • Remind their child that everyone gets nervous when they go away to camp, especially if it’s their first time
  • Show confidence that they’ll enjoy their time away
  • Remind them about other new experiences they’ve overcome in the past
  • Find out how the camp deals with homesickness so you can be prepared
  • Provide your child with pre-addressed, stamped envelopes, pen, and paper so they can write home whenever they want
  • Provide lots of attention in the days preceding the separation
  • Make goodbyes short and to the point. Dragging them out can make both parties nervous and delay the possibility of moving past the anxiety.

In most cases, the above steps will go a long way in eliminating or reducing separation anxiety that arises before a sleep-away summer camp. In some situations, however, the anxiety may persist despite all efforts. In this instance, parents are encouraged to seek professional help, especially if the child’s symptoms have begun to interfere with their school performance or friends. For more information on summer camp separation anxiety, contact child anxiety therapist Dr. Andrew Rosen at 561-496-1094 or email him today.

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Bin Laden’s Death And Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

In recent days, the nation has been captivated by the shocking news that Osama bin Laden, the al-Qaeda leader responsible for planning the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, was killed by an elite team of U.S. Navy SEALS. September 11, 2001 will stand in memory as one of the most horrific events to take place on American soil. It has been responsible for one of the largest epidemics of post traumatic stress the United States has ever seen and the news of bin Laden’s death is sure to have an impact on that.

To understand the affects of this news, you must first understand the basics of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Trauma occurs when a person has experienced, witnessed, or been confronted with a terrible event or injury. The threat of a life or death situation to themselves or others can produce the same result. Of course, it is normal to experience a strong reaction after such an event but when Post Traumatic Stress Disorder occurs, it is because the victim has experienced PTSD symptoms for at least a month with dramatic impact to their everyday life.

The symptoms of PTSD include:

  • Re-experiencing the trauma
  • Persistent avoidance
  • Increased state of arousal

Now, with the death of Osama bin Laden, there is a complicated array of emotions that may affect victims of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder in a multitude of ways. For some, it may:

  • Dredge up old feelings and the risk of a relapse
  • Heighten their PTSD out of anxiety that bin Laden’s death could provoke retaliation from radical Islamic groups
  • Bring a sense of closure similar to hearing a guilty verdict at a murder trial

No matter what side of the coin you’re on, the good news will always be that PTSD can be controlled with the proper treatment. Treatment may include individual psychotherapy, Cognitive Behavior Therapy, medicine, or peer group support. If you or someone you know is suffering from this disorder, seeking help can get you back on the path to a normal life.

For more information and help for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder in the South Florida area, contact Boca Raton Post Traumatic Stress Disorder therapist Dr. Andrew Rosen at 561-496-1094 or email him today.

 

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Expectations of Beauty – Body Image Disorder

It is natural for most people to feel some level of self-consciousness regarding their appearance in the presence of others. But for some, this concern rises past an unhealthy level and develops into a chronic mental condition known as Body Dysmorphic Disorder or Body Image Disorder. People who suffer from this disorder can’t stop thinking about a flaw in their appearance that may be either minor or imagined. For victims of this disorder, this minor or imagined flaw seems so shameful they don’t want to be seen by anyone.

Signs of Body Dysmorphic Disorder may include:

  • Preoccupation with physical appearance
  • Frequent examination in the mirror or, conversely, avoidance of mirrors
  • Belief that others take special notice of your appearance in a negative way
  • Extreme self-consciousness
  • Constantly seeking cosmetic procedures to “fix” perceived flaws without satisfaction
  • The need to seek reassurance about your appearance from others
  • Excessive grooming, such as hair plucking
  • Skin picking
  • Refusal to appear in pictures
  • Avoidance of social situations
  • The need to wear excessive makeup or clothing to hide perceived flaws

This condition, often referred to as “imagined ugliness,” can arise as a result of childhood teasing or societal expectations of beauty. For most people with Body Image Disorder, the majority of their attention focuses on one particular part of their body. This could be any bodily attribute, but some of the more commonly seen features include:

  • Nose
  • Hair
  • Skin
  • Complexion
  • Wrinkles
  • Acne and blemishes
  • Baldness
  • Breast size
  • Muscle size
  • Genitalia

Treatment for this condition often includes medication and cognitive behavioral therapy. However, left untreated, this condition can lead to suicidal thoughts and behavior, repeated hospitalizations, difficulty attending work or school, lack of self-esteem, obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression or mood disorders, social phobia, substance abuse, or a lack of close relationships. Because of these traumatic consequences, it is important to seek help if you or a loved one is impacted by the symptoms listed above.

For more information on Body Image Disorder and cognitive behavior therapy and/or medication in the Boca Raton, Florida area, contact South Florida anxiety disorder specialist Dr. Andrew Rosen at 561-496-1094 or email him today.

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Therapy For Dealing With Life Changes

Illness, marriage, divorce, work problems, and having children are all life phases that many of us will undergo at some point in our lives. These phases, along with numerous other possibilities, can affect our normal routine and create a new environment that requires us to adapt. For some, dealing with life changes comes naturally but for others life changes may trigger an extreme emotional jolt that leads to Phase of Life Adjustment Anxiety; a condition that can heavily impact their daily lives.

Understandably so, many people experience this anxiety disorder during the typical transitional life periods: adolescence, middle age, and late life. The anxiety they develop can lead to feelings of:

  • Insecurity
  • Concern
  • Helplessness
  • Recklessness
  • Fear

Luckily therapy has been known to reduce or alleviate the affects of this disorder on most patients. In many cases, group therapy is suggested because this disorder has a high possibility of affecting those closest to the victim. Therapy can help the person’s loved ones understand the concerns they are experiencing while dealing with life changes as well as coping techniques that everyone can participate in. Treatment may also include techniques for tension reduction, increased social interaction, or family therapy.

Because this Phase of Life Adjustment Anxiety often leads to negative behavior, it can be tempting for loved ones to want to rescue the victim from their actions. However, most professionals suggest practicing tough love where this is concerned. Sometimes forcing someone to start dealing with life changes and with the consequences of their behavior can get them on the right track toward relief. Some examples of this unusual behavior can include:

  • Skipping school or work
  • Acting out
  • Withdrawing socially
  • Physical illness
  • Having difficulties in personal relationships
  • Performing poorly at work or school
  • Driving fast or acting recklessly
  • Spending money erratically

If you or someone you know is exhibiting these kinds of behaviors it is important to seek help before the anxiety leads to broken relationships, loss of employment, or something worse. For more information about dealing with life changes in the Delray Beach, Florida area, contact South Florida anxiety therapist Dr. Andrew Rosen at 561-496-1094 or email him today.

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Mindfulness Therapy Can Help With Anxiety Disorders

In today’s stress-ridden world, more than 19 million Americans are affected by anxiety disorders. The tension they feel at work, during tests, or in social situations has become irrational and excessive to the point that anxiety disables them in their everyday lives. For most, anxiety disorder introduces an overwhelming loss of control over their thoughts and emotions.

There are several possible treatments for anxiety disorder, but one that is gaining popularity is the concept of mindfulness therapy. Mindfulness, with its roots in Buddhist philosophy, encourages a complete commitment to the present moment.

In the majority of cases, anxiety disorder develops as a result of a past incident. For example, if a person was bitten by a dog as a child, they may become anxious around dogs or animals of all kinds. Through mindfulness therapy, however, that person learns to stop using that past experience to inform their present.

There are seven important elements of the mindfulness attitude:

  • Non-judging – Becoming an impartial observer without making a positive or negative evaluation of what is happening.
  • Patience – Cultivating the understanding that everything must develop in its own time.
  • Beginner’s Mind –The willingness to observe the world with an open mind – as if it were your first time doing so.
  • Trust – Having trust in yourself, your intuition, and your abilities.
  • Non-Striving – The state of not doing anything toward a particular purpose. This can be especially difficult for people in Western cultures, as it requires accepting that things happen in the moment just as they are supposed to.
  • Acceptance – Acknowledging the thoughts, feelings, sensations, and beliefs you have and understanding that they are those things only; they can’t affect your immediate experience without your permission.
  • Non-Attachment – Refusing to attach meaning to thoughts and emotions. Instead, let feelings or thoughts come and go without connecting them to anything.

It can take time to develop a true mindfulness attitude but the reward is that you will have more control over your own life. For the people who suffer from anxiety disorder, this can mean a dramatic change in their everyday lives.

For more information about mindfulness therapy in Boca Raton, Florida, contact Dr. Andrew Rosen and the anxiety disorder specialists at the Center For Treatment of Anxiety Disorders at 561-496-1094 or email Dr. Rosen today.

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South Florida Anxiety Therapist Offers Anxiety and Substance Abuse Information

In today’s stress-filled world, anxiety disorders are on the rise, with over 19 million Americans affected. There are many types of anxiety disorders but when alcohol and substance abuse gets thrown into the mix, these conditions become even more complicated. Alcohol and substance abuse fuels anxiety disorders that are already present. In addition, people with anxiety disorders are two to three times more likely to have an alcohol and substance abuse disorder. In fact, the more one looks at the issue, the more obvious it is that a vicious cycle exists between anxiety and substance abuse.
           
When considering the anxiety and substance abuse cycle it can often be difficult to determine which comes first, the anxiety disorder or the alcohol and substance abuse. Some examples that are frequently seen include:

  • Social anxiety disorder leading to alcohol abuse: a person with social anxiety disorder typically feels nervous and uncomfortable in even the most common social situations. They often turn to alcohol to lessen their anxiety.
  • Post traumatic stress disorder and substance abuse occuring together: terrible dreams and hallucinations are often associated with post traumatic stress and a variety of substances. As a result, using certain substances – especially illegal ones – can increase the feelings associated with traumatic experiences, leading to the official disorder. Likewise, post traumatic stress can lead a person to drugs as a way to escape their condition.
  • Alcohol or drugs causing panic disorder: alcohol and drug-induced states can lead some people to hallucinations or experiences that cause panic attacks. As panic attacks occur more often the person develops panic disorder, or the constant anxiety or fear that they will experience a panic attack.

When alcohol and substance abuse occur with an anxiety disorder, treatment can be tricky. Treating the substance abuse will not cure the anxiety disorder or vice-versa, so it is best to treat the anxiety and substance abuse simultaneously. This is especially effective in helping to prevent a relapse. Therapy generally consists of cognitive behavior therapy, which helps the person identify, understand, and change their thinking and behavior patterns. Since medication can be a common part of anxiety disorder treatment, it must be approached carefully in order to avoid aggravating the substance abuse disorder and any chemical interactions that could occur as a result of that condition. If medicine is indicated, most doctors will prescribe medications with low abuse potential.

For more information about anxiety and substance abuse disorder and treatment in the Delray Beach, Florida area, contact South Florida anxiety therapist Dr. Andrew Rosen at 561-496-1094 or email him today.

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