All Posts in Category: General Mental Health

Midlife Anxiety

When someone goes through dissatisfaction with their job or marriage and they are in their forties or fifties, the first thing everyone says is that they must be having a midlife crisis. We hear about this phase of life as people transition from young adult to middle age so often that it almost feels like a crisis is a “given”. And, on some level, it may be. As people go from being the young, carefree person of their twenties who is just getting established in a career or marriage, to the responsible person who is expected to have gotten their lives together by the time they reach their forties, it is inevitable that people will look back and second guess decisions or wonder “what if.” For many people, this emotional jolt can bring on midlife anxiety.

Midlife Crisis Symptoms

Unlike a medical condition, midlife anxiety doesn’t have specific symptoms. Instead, it’s a mixture of emotions, feelings, and body changes that lead to the strong sense that something needs to change.  Among other things, it can be triggered by factors such as an event that reminds you that you are aging, the death of a parent, children leaving home for college, or a health scare of your own.

Things that might be signs of midlife crisis are:

  • Unexplained annoyance or anger
  • The desire to get in shape or surgically modify your body
  • Coveting that shiny new sports car or wanting to try something daring, such as skydiving
  • Feeling trapped – whether it’s financially, career-wise, or in your relationships
  • Becoming preoccupied with death
  • Constantly wondering where your life is heading or regretting your life choices
  • Losing sleep or changing your eating habits
  • Dissatisfaction with the things that used to make you happy

Additionally, keep in mind that the feelings of helplessness or worry aren’t just confined to midlife anxiety. These emotions can come up anytime during a period in which you are transitioning to a new phase of life. Leaving the teen years and becoming a college student, a parent’s empty-nest syndrome, or an elderly person who moves from a beloved home into a senior-care apartment are all examples of situations that can bring on the same symptoms as those of midlife anxiety. Even being diagnosed with a medical illness or condition can make you feel vulnerable and may bring up these symptoms.

How to Cope if You’re Having a Midlife Crisis

When you’re faced with midlife anxiety, the urge to do something – anything – can be very powerful, so the first thing to do is: nothing. Despite how you feel, this really isn’t the time to make major changes in your life that you may find yourself regretting when your anxiety has diminished.

Instead:

  • Mourn your losses, but don’t dwell on them. Try to reframe the negatives by looking at them in a different way.
  • Take some space away from your daily routine to pause and think about the next phase of your life. What new ambitions do you have? What would you like to accomplish over the next few years? Ignore the little voice in your head that tells you that you are being selfish or should stop daydreaming.
  • Count your blessings. Recognize and write down the things in your life for which you are grateful, then reread your list when you are feeling regretful about something.
  • Do something that will refocus your thoughts – volunteer, take a class, or get involved with a mentoring program.
  • Let go of the things that aren’t serving you and embrace the positives. Challenge your negative thinking (for example, make a list of the trials and pitfalls you went through to get where you are today to remind yourself that the “good old days” weren’t always carefree and wonderful).
  • Be gentle with yourself. Don’t try to stuff your emotions or judge yourself for having them.
  • Talk to someone. Psychotherapy for phase of life anxiety can help lessen or alleviate the ongoing symptoms that come with a midlife crisis before they get out of hand. For some, group therapy is a great way to interact with others who are going through the same issues so you can see that they have the same concerns and problems as you. If therapy isn’t an option, reach out to supportive friends, read books on how to help a midlife crisis, or turn to your clergy for support.

Can Midlife Anxiety Actually Help You?

Remember that midlife anxiety doesn’t have to be something that leads to a crisis! You can channel your concerns into new opportunities and bring greater meaning to your life. This can be a time to:

  • Set new goals to replace your outdated or less relevant objectives. For example, if you’re no longer aiming to climb the corporate ladder, try mentoring a younger colleague.
  • Start that hobby you’ve been thinking about pursuing. After all – if not now, when?
  • Learn a new language or acquire a new skill.
  • Give back through volunteering or community work, such as coaching a team sport or helping out at a soup kitchen.
  • Renew or consider beginning a spiritual life to help you find strength outside yourself.
  • Begin stress management strategies. Take up yoga or learn meditation. Practice mindfulness. Keep a gratitude journal. Start an exercise program.

Professional Help for Midlife Anxiety

If you or a loved one is experiencing midlife anxiety, the mental health professionals at The Center for Treatment of Anxiety and Mood Disorders in Delray Beach, Florida can help. For more information, contact us or call us today at 561-496-1094.

Read More

ADAA Session Recording -Treatment Resistant Panic Disorder

Our team presented at the 2018 ADAA Conference on Treatment Resistant Panic Disorder: A Multidisciplinary Multimodality Approach. You can access the audio recording of our session here with the below login credentials.

Username: arosen1980@aol.com

Password: 1667947

We hope you find the recording of our presentation helpful and informative!

Read More

LGBTQ Mental Health

Studies have shown that people who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning (LGBTQ) suffer from higher levels of anxiety and depression than the general public. In fact, approximately 30 – 60 % of the LGBTQ population have anxiety and depression and, as a whole, the LGBTQ community faces disproportionately high rates of suicide, self-harm, substance abuse and addiction. While there are many things that can influence a person’s mental and emotional wellbeing, prejudice and discrimination add additional trauma to LGBTQ mental health concerns.

Factors that Affect LGBTQ Mental Health

In and of itself, simply being LGBTQ does not affect a person’s mental health condition. Identifying against a cultural norm, however, exposes an LGBTQ person to prejudice and discrimination that their heterosexual counterparts don’t generally face. Some factors that affect LGBTQ mental health are:

  • Bullying
  • Homophobic societal attitudes
  • Hate crimes against LGBTQ people
  • Minority stress, which is a constant need to be “on guard” and to watch out for potential threats
  • Negative self-image and self-loathing due to societal attitudes
  • Lack of awareness of where to find positive role models
  • Media coverage that is beginning to embrace the LGBTQ culture on one hand, but shows detrimental news stories about the treatment of the community on the other
  • Worry about showing their true selves at work for fear of losing clients or promotions
  • Fear of being denied housing
  • Discrimination against transgender people within the LGBTQ community

Despite the fact that society is slowly becoming more accepting of the LGBT community, an uphill battle still remains. LGBTQ people have heard from birth that being something other than heterosexual or identifying with the gender you were born into is wrong. For example, although gay marriage was recently legalized, federal law still allows for legal discrimination in the workplace because it doesn’t protect people based on sexual orientation or gender identity. People can still legally be evicted from housing, fired from their job, or refused public or private services because of their LGBTQ status. Additionally, it is all too common for family members to reject someone who comes out to them.

Up to 65% of LGBT people suffer from some level of homophobia themselves (the belief that being LGBTQ is wrong). Hearing throughout their lives that they are somehow flawed causes many people to internalize those negative thoughts. Those who don’t have family or peer support have a harder time, as do those individuals who tend toward more negative personalities or have gone through adverse experiences, such as rejection or bullying.

On the other hand, even LGBTQ people who have supportive family and friends can end up feeling that their sexual or gender identity is somehow wrong. Often, people who love them want to help, but have no idea how to do so, and end up suggesting “cures” or a laundry list of worries (“you’re going to get AIDS”). These things contribute to the person’s feeling of being unworthy or hopeless. When the individual internalizes this shame from a young age, it often leads to long-term mental and emotional consequences.

Compassionate Care is Needed

For LGBTQ people, talking about their problems can feel like they are reinforcing the damaging stereotype against the gay and transgender community. Many individuals have been kicked out of their homes or shunned by family members and friends after they’ve come out. As an example, it’s estimated that about 40% of the homeless population in Southern California consists of homeless LGBT youth.

Compassionate care is needed to help the LGBTQ community recover from its serious mental health issues. Obviously, mental health providers should approach and treat their LGBT patients in the same manner as they would any other patient. However, they also need to understand how oppression and other factors contribute to anxiety and depression in these patients.

We Can Help

Our mental health professionals provide caring, compassionate LGBTQ mental health services. For more information, contact The Center for Treatment of Anxiety and Mood Disorders in Delray Beach, Florida. Call us today at 561-496-1094.

Read More

How Stress Affects Child Development

free anxiety workshop on childhood anxietyStress surrounds us on a daily basis. From traffic delays to work projects, worries about finances or health, and news reports of world events, the demands of our everyday lives produce both positive and negative stress. Stressors (which are the things that cause your stress) can be physical, emotional, theoretical, or environmental. Even positive events like weddings and job promotions cause stress.

Whether negative or positive, one thing is certain – stress raises the body’s anxiety levels. When we’re under stress, the “fight or flight” response kicks in, raising blood pressure and heart rate, and sometimes causing you to lose sleep or feel like you can’t breathe. While this response usually subsides after the stressor is removed, a prolonged or permanent stress response can develop in someone who is under constant stress. It’s called toxic stress, and children can be affected by it just the same as adults.

What are the Effects of Stress on Kids?

The incidence of obesity, diabetes and heart problems, cancer and other diseases goes up when a child lives with toxic stress. Additionally, their chances of depression, substance abuse and dependence, smoking, teen pregnancy and/or sexually transmitted disease, suicide and domestic violence greatly increase. So does their tendency to be more violent or to become a victim of violence.

Studies done by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have shown that when a child is subjected to frequent or continual stress from thing like neglect, abuse, dysfunctional families or domestic abuse, and they lack adequate support from adults, their brain architecture is actually altered and their organ systems become weakened. As a result, these kids risk lifelong health and social problems.

Of the 17,000 people who took part in the CDC study, two thirds had an Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) score of 1 or higher. 87% of those people had more than one ACE. By measuring and scoring ten types of trauma ranging from childhood sexual abuse to neglect or bullying and even divorce, researchers were able to assess the chronic disease risk for the study’s mostly white, middle class participants. Their results show that the problem of toxic stress isn’t limited to children who face poverty or to those who come from certain ethnic groups – children from all walks of life can have high ACE scores.

If you are interested in finding out your ACE score and what it might mean for you, go here.

Signs of stress

Children who are exposed to toxic stress exhibit:

  • Poorly developed executive functioning skills
  • Lack of self-regulation and self-reflection
  • Reduced impulse control
  • Maladaptive coping skills
  • Poor stress management

Research on children who face continued toxic stress shows they have:

  • More trouble learning in school
  • More difficulty trusting adults and forming healthy relationships and an increased chance of divorce as an adult
  • Higher incidence of unhealthy behaviors such as substance abuse, sexual experimentation and unsafe sexual practices, engaging in high-risk sports, smoking and alcohol abuse
  • Higher incidence of depressive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD), behavioral disorders, and even psychosis
  • Poor health outcomes such as obesity, heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and a higher suicide risk

Help for Toxic Stress

Awareness is key to preventing and reducing toxic stress in kids. Now that we know about the effects of ACEs, many states have conducted their own research. Some cities have set up task forces and others are working with schools, pediatricians, daycare centers and the justice system to set up screening programs that can turn lives around.

Protecting children from toxic stress involves a multi-faceted approach that targets both the caretaker and the child in order to strengthen family stability. Treatment includes intervention and implementation of methods that decrease stressors and strengthen the individual’s response to stress.

As more programs are enacted, researchers are finding that children benefit even when the solutions are solely focused on their caregiver and not on the child. This is likely because the caregiver’s altered interaction with the child makes the child feel safer. Parenting classes, family-based programs, access to social resources for parents, telephone support and peer support are beneficial, as are cognitive behavioral therapy and relaxation methods like yoga and mindfulness. Additionally, community-based programs like Head Start have been shown to be effective.

Do you have Questions?

For more information about toxic stress and its effects on child development, talk to the mental health professionals at The Center for Treatment of Anxiety and Mood Disorders in Delray Beach, Florida. Contact us or call us today at 561-496-1094.

 

Read More

Gambling Addiction

We’d all like to be rich. Playing the lottery or making an occasional trip to Las Vegas or some nearby casino allows us to indulge in the dream of being wealthy someday. Bright lights lure us in and sporadic gaming payouts tempt us into believing we might just hit it big. But, while it’s generally fine for most people to wager on games of chance once in a while, for those at risk of a gambling addiction, giving into the temptation may trigger a slide into a gambling problem.

Why do People Gamble?

People don’t usually gamble for one single reason, although the underlying motivation for gambling is typically profit based. The thought of seeing coins flowing out of a slot machine like an endless silver waterfall or the Hollywood movie scene of a casino piling stacks of money in front of a winner can move almost anyone to take a chance on gambling.

Aside from profit, however, people often gamble for:

  • Excitement – think about the thrill of the flashing lights and bells that go off when someone wins on a slot machine
  • Pleasure and the euphoria of winning every so often
  • Escape from troubles
  • Social valuation – even if they lose a lot of money, a person may feel that the act of gambling shows they are successful enough to be able to afford to lose it (even if that isn’t really true)
  • Pride – if someone wins a few hands of poker, they feel smart and invincible
  • The chance you could change your life with very little effort
  • Social acceptance – this applies to many games, ranging from playing bingo at church to joining in football pools with friends on Game Day

Pathological Gambling Risk Factors

Around 1 to 3 percent of people in the United States are impacted by a gambling problem. As with other addictions, gambling disorders tend to run in families. Those who suffer from this impulse-control disorder also tend to have issues with anxiety and depression and/or problems with substance abuse or alcoholism. The disorder symptoms may come and go, but without treatment, the problem will return.

A gambling addiction usually starts between the ages of 20 and 40 in females and in early adolescence in males, however it can happen at any stage of life. While it can affect anyone, the risk of compulsive gambling increases in those who are highly competitive, are workaholics, have a friend or family member with a gambling compulsion, or in those who have bipolar disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), or attention-deficit/hyperactive disorder (ADHD).

Symptoms of a Gambling Addiction

In the same way as alcohol or drugs, gambling stimulates the brain’s reward center. Just like with any addiction, a person with a gambling disorder can’t resist gambling even if they don’t have the money to lose. They hide their need to gamble from family and friends and vehemently deny they have a problem. They feel compelled to keep playing in order to recover their losses. They also become tense and anxious when they can’t satisfy their urge to gamble and will feel relief when they finally get their “fix.”

The American Psychiatric Association (APA) defines a gambling disorder as involving “repeated problematic gambling behavior that causes significant problems or distress. It is also called gambling addiction or compulsive gambling.”

If family, friends, or coworkers have talked to you about your gambling, you may have a gambling problem. To help clarify if you may be a compulsive gambler, this list from the APA can help you decide:

A diagnosis of gambling disorder requires at least four of the following during the past year (Note: this questionnaire is not intended to replace professional diagnosis):

  1. Need to gamble with increasing amount of money to achieve the desired excitement
  2. Restless or irritable when trying to cut down or stop gambling
  3. Repeated unsuccessful efforts to control, cut back on or stop gambling
  4. Frequent thoughts about gambling (such as reliving past gambling experiences, planning the next gambling venture, thinking of ways to get money to gamble)
  5. Often gambling when feeling distressed
  6. After losing money gambling, often returning to get even (referred to as “chasing” one’s losses)
  7. Lying to conceal gambling activity
  8. Jeopardizing or losing a significant relationship, job or educational/career opportunity because of gambling
  9. Relying on others to help with money problems caused by gambling

Add up your score:

  • 4 to 5: Shows a mild gambling problem
  • 6 to 7: Points to a moderate gambling problem
  • 8 to 9: Indicates a severe gambling problem

Self-Help for Gambling Addiction

The biggest step toward recovery is acknowledging that you have a gambling problem. While it is difficult to quit gambling, many people have done so and were able to rebuild their lives. The path is easier when you have support.

Some self-help tips are:

  • Find a support group, like Gamblers Anonymous or get support from a mental health professional
  • Seek treatment for any underlying mood disorders, such as anxiety or depression, which can trigger a gambling problem
  • Reach out to family and friends for help
  • Practice relaxation techniques, such as yoga or mindfulness
  • Distract yourself by starting an exercise program or taking up a sport.
  • Spend time with non-gambling friends or take up a hobby. Be certain not to isolate yourself
  • Visualize what will happen if you gamble. How will you feel if you disappoint everyone again or if you lose all your money again?
  • If you are the family member or friend of a gambler, don’t pay off their debts. You run the very real risk of enabling them to gamble again.

Help for Gambling Addiction

If you or a loved one need help to stop compulsive gambling, the mental health professionals at The Center for Treatment of Anxiety and Mood Disorders in Delray Beach, Florida can help. For more information, contact us or call us today at 561-496-1094.

Read More

Coping With Suicide and the Loss of a Loved One

Suicide is devastating to the ones left behind. It brings up a myriad of powerful emotions: among other things, you must deal with feelings of shock, anger, guilt, and overwhelming grief. The survivor is left wondering if they could have done something to prevent the person from taking their life. They are often furious at the deceased person for leaving them or for putting them through this heart-wrenching experience. And, the survivor must learn about the grieving process when it comes to coping with suicide so they can continue on with their own life.

*If you are grieving a loved one, please be gentle with yourself during this devastating time and know that you could not have done anything to prevent this suicide. More than ninety percent of the time, suicide happens because the person was deeply depressed or facing another form of mental illness. Depression and mental illnesses are caused by chemical imbalances in the brain, which keep the person from seeing their situation clearly. In their mind, they believed there was no other way to deal with their pain.

Also, if you are facing the loss of a loved one through suicide, please know that you do not have to go through these intense emotions alone. Talk with your family, join one of the suicide support groups in your area, turn to the clergy or supportive friends, or speak with a therapist who specializes in trauma and grief counseling.

Read More

The Center for Treatment of Anxiety and Mood Disorders Receives 2017 Best of Delray Beach Award

Delray Beach Award Program Honors the Achievement

DELRAY BEACH July 5, 2017 — The Center for Treatment of Anxiety and Mood Disorders has been selected for the 2017 Best of Delray Beach Award in the Mental Health Clinic category by the Delray Beach Award Program.

Each year, the Delray Beach Award Program identifies companies that we believe have achieved exceptional marketing success in their local community and business category. These are local companies that enhance the positive image of small business through service to their customers and our community. These exceptional companies help make the Delray Beach area a great place to live, work and play.

Various sources of information were gathered and analyzed to choose the winners in each category. The 2017 Delray Beach Award Program focuses on quality, not quantity. Winners are determined based on the information gathered both internally by the Delray Beach Award Program and data provided by third parties.

Read the full press release here.

To learn more about how the center’s services may help you, please call us at (561) 496-1094 or complete our contact form.

Read More

ADHD and Anxiety – Is There a Relationship?

Do ADHD and anxiety go hand in hand?

If you have been diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder, you may also be experiencing challenges with anxiety. But, what is it about these conditions that causes them to occur together?

ADHD Facts

By now nearly everyone has heard of Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHA). ADHD is a mental illness that is thought to be biological in nature. ADHA is the same as Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) – the name that was originally used when people first became aware of the disorder. Although the names are often used interchangeably, the most current name is ADHD.

ADHD symptoms include:

  • an inability to focus
  • restlessness
  • disorganization
  • difficulty completing tasks
  • impulsive behavior
  • hyperactivity in children, although this behavior tends to diminish in adulthood

You do not have to experience all of these symptoms to have Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder.

How common is ADHD? Statistics show that about 11 million adults (about 5% of the USA’s population) have the condition. However, less than 20% of adults who have the disorder have actually been diagnosed and, of those identified adults, only about 25% have pursued treatment. People who were diagnosed in childhood often continue to experience symptoms in adulthood – about two thirds of children with the condition will continue to require some form of treatment in their adult life. Additionally, while we used to think the disorder only affected males, we now know females can have ADHD.

Can You Have Both ADHD and Anxiety?

Experiencing ADHD and anxiety is more common than you may think. Somewhere between 30% and 50% of adults with ADHD will also have some type of anxiety disorder. These disorders can range anywhere from generalized anxiety or social anxiety to panic disorder, phobias, and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD).

The reason anxiety is so common in conjunction with ADHD is twofold. First, there is a theory that both ADD and anxiety disorders may carry a genetic component. Having a close relative with either condition can increase your chances of being diagnosed with their same disorder. Additionally, research is being conducted to find out if there is an environmental component that triggers both conditions, such as exposure to lead or toxins.

The second reason is that having the disorder is stressful and can lead to feeling overwhelmed and vulnerable. When you worry about things like possibly forgetting a work deadline or when your symptoms affect your relationships or daily activities, you may feel angry or disappointed. Being upset and anxious can make it more difficult to seek help and may cause people to stay in their comfortable but potentially ineffective patterns.

Anxiety and ADHD Treatment

Because ADHD is a brain-based disorder, it is generally treated with medication to help normalize brain function. The challenge to treatment with medicine, however, is that some ADHD prescriptions can worsen the symptoms of anxiety in some patients.

Ideally, a combined approach to anxiety and ADHD treatment works best. This should include Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) or another form of mindfulness based therapy, in addition to medication. These therapies provide coping techniques: learning these skills can be an invaluable tool to help you stay positive about change.

Undergoing CBT can help you improve productivity, learn to be accountable, and can aid in identifying and achieving goals. Additionally, support groups and talk therapy can help you come to terms with the interpersonal effects the disorder can bring. Feelings of shame, guilt, failure, and their resulting stress can be reduced by processing them in a friendly, compassionate setting.

There also are some steps you can take at home to help improve your symptoms:

  • Exercise regularly (30 minutes per day) to decrease anxiety.
  • Create schedules to help stay on task.
  • Get seven to eight hours of sleep per night. Being well-rested helps reduce anxiety.
  • Identify your triggers and work with your therapist to learn coping strategies.
  • Practice relaxation techniques, such as meditation or deep breathing.
  • Decrease your stress and surround yourself with positive, supportive people.
  • Try to minimize worry and negative thinking.

If You Have Questions, We Can Help

If you have questions or need help managing your ADHD and anxiety, the therapists at The Center for Treatment of Anxiety and Mood Disorders in Delray Beach, Florida are there to help. For more information, contact us or call us today at 561-496-1094.

Save

Read More

Psychotherapy or Medication – Which Should You Choose?

In today’s world, if you turn on a television, play a game on an electronic device, read a magazine, or listen to the radio, the chances are high that you’ll see or hear an ad for psychotropic medications. Prescriptions for anxiety medication and depression medication are pitched to people so often that the majority of us have at least heard of this option for treating mental illnesses.

As a society, we all want an easy fix to our problems. Ads for psychotropic medications make them sound as if they are an effortless method for treating anxiety, depression, and other mental illnesses. After all, why spend time on psychotherapy when you can pop a pill and get relief instantly? However, like everything in life, there are compelling reasons to choose one or the other.

Benefits of Psychotherapy

For many people, treatment programs like Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Psycho-dynamic Psychotherapy, or In-vivo Therapy, have proven to have more lasting results than psychotropic medications. The reason is that these therapies teach you coping skills. They help you identify inaccurate or negative thinking and then give you the necessary tools to challenge and replace these beliefs.

When someone goes through psychotherapy, they learn what triggers their reactions to specific fears, places, or situations. Cognitive therapy and other “talk therapies” help people overcome these triggers so they can have a better quality of life. Moreover, these methods teach skills that are lifelong. This allows the person to not only feel better, but gives them something to fall back on if their stressors return at some point in the future.

Unlike with the potential of some psychotropic medications, psychotherapy is not addictive. Furthermore, some studies have shown that Cognitive Behavioral Therapy can be more effective at relieving anxiety and depression than medication.

Benefits of Psychotropic Medications

Depression medications and anxiety medications are among the most prescribed drugs worldwide. Advertisements have taught us to recognize drug names and to request them from our medical professionals. These drugs are seen as a “magic bullet” for mental illnesses. Indeed, the benefit of psychotropic medications is that some people may see a quicker, short term improvement in their symptoms, especially if their case is severe. Medications are generally cheaper than psychotherapy and are often covered under insurance, while therapy is sometimes limited or may not be covered at all.

That being said, there are drawbacks to psychotropic medications. Some of these drugs have very adverse side effects – a fact many people ignore when they see the list of them scrolling rapidly through an advertisement. These medications are often prescribed on a trial-and-error basis, wherein the drugs are changed if the person is not getting the symptom relief they are hoping for. Also, many individuals fear taking anxiety medication or depression medication because of the worry over becoming addicted to them or the fear that their personality may be altered. Additionally, they are concerned that they will never be able to get off the medication in the future because their depression or anxiety will return if they do.

What About a Combination of Therapy and Medication?

Current research has shown that, in many cases, a combination of psychotropic medications and psychotherapy gives patients the best result. Medications can help alleviate the symptoms of depression and anxiety more quickly, thus giving the person a chance to improve their symptoms while undergoing psychotherapy at the same time.

Combining these treatments programs can provide improvement in symptoms, teach the skills that will allow you to cope with or change your symptoms, and help you feel better. Furthermore, psychotherapy gives you the tools to cope if symptoms arise again.

Do You Have Questions About Psychotherapy or Psychotropic Medications?

Questions about whether you’ll benefit the most from medication, therapy, or a combination of the two, are best answered by working with a mental health professional. The therapists at The Center for Treatment of Anxiety and Mood Disorders in Delray Beach, Florida are there to help. For more information, contact us or call us today at 561-496-1094.

 

Save

Read More

Pregnancy and Mental Health

Having a baby should be a joyous event, but for many women, the time surrounding a pregnancy can come with a variety of emotional and physical struggles. For those who are coping with postpartum depression, infertility, prenatal depression, or miscarriage, the issues related to getting pregnant (or even of becoming a mother) can be stressful and may lead to depression and other pregnancy and mental health concerns.

It isn’t unusual to experience sadness or fear about your pregnancy or becoming a parent. If you are trying to become pregnant, infertility concerns or the costs you may be facing for infertility treatments can be worrisome. Also, any woman may become anxious or depressed during their pregnancy or after they have a baby. If you do, it doesn’t mean you’re a bad mom, and you don’t have to suffer through it. The most important thing to do is talk to someone and get help if you feel anxious, depressed, or overwhelmed before, during, or after your pregnancy.

Postpartum Depression

According to the National Institute for Mental Health, postpartum depression and its accompanying anxiety can affect nearly 15% of new mothers at some point during the first year after giving birth. Postpartum depression can be a very serious mood disorder and is different than having the “baby blues” that some women experience due a change in hormone levels after childbirth. In general, postpartum depression lasts longer than two weeks and is more severe than the post-birth blues.

Left untreated, postpartum depression can lead to postpartum psychosis in which you consider harming your baby, yourself, or contemplate suicide. If your symptoms do not improve after two weeks or if they get worse, call a medical professional without delay!

Infertility and Mental Health

Infertility affects between 10 and 15 percent of couples. If you have tried unsuccessfully to get pregnant for more than one year (or, for more than 6 months if you are 35 or over), you may have infertility concerns. Additionally, women who become pregnant but are unable to carry their fetus to term may also be infertile.

Stress, anxiety, and depression are common when you want a child but have not been able to conceive. You may also experience marital issues, low self-esteem, and sexual dysfunction.

Prenatal Depression

Roughly 10 to 20 percent of mothers-to-be will struggle with prenatal depression (depression during their pregnancy). Stress can contribute to the development of depression. Marital problems, the age you are when you become pregnant, limited social support, uncertainty about the pregnancy, or having a prior history of depression can also contribute to new or worsening depression.

Prenatal depression can keep you from sleeping well, eating right, or taking good care of yourself. It can make you more likely to use alcohol, tobacco, or illegal drugs that could harm you or your baby. Additionally, some studies suggest that depression during pregnancy may increase the risk for pre-term delivery and low infant birth weight.

Your health and that of your baby should come first. Talking to your partner, your family, or your friends about your concerns can often make all the difference in helping lessen your prenatal depression. If you feel sad or anxious, consider talking with a mental health professional. They will work with you to manage your symptoms and develop a treatment plan to help you cope.

Coping with Miscarriage

Going through a loss of pregnancy is devastating, no matter the stage of pregnancy or the circumstances of the miscarriage. After losing a pregnancy, you’ll need to go through a grieving process. You may feel bitter, guilty, angry and helpless. Certain things may set you back, such as seeing a friend who is pregnant or passing a family with a new baby on the sidewalk.

Allow yourself time to mourn your pregnancy loss and to accept what’s happened. Talk to your partner, your family, and your friends or join a support group. Take care of yourself by getting enough sleep, taking things slow, eating right and exercising. It may help to keep a journal of your feelings.

If you have tried these things and are still having trouble dealing with your grief and loss, talk to your physician, a grief counselor, or a mental health professional for support.

Mood Disorders and Pregnancy

If you already have a mood disorder and become pregnant, it can be tempting to discontinue any psychotropic medications. However doing this can cause harm to you and your unborn baby, and can make you particularly vulnerable to relapse. One study showed the risk of recurrence was significantly higher in women who discontinued treatment with mood stabilizers. Before stopping any medication, you should discuss your pregnancy with your mental health professional so they can conduct a thorough risk/benefit analysis. This analysis should include the impact of untreated illness on both you and your baby, as well as weigh the risk of using medication during your pregnancy.

Treatment for Pregnancy and Mental Health Concerns

If you have anxiety, depression, or other pregnancy and mental health concerns, physical causes should be ruled out first. A medical exam will be able to exclude hypoglycemia, thyroid deficiency, or other health conditions that may be causing your depression or anxiety.

Next, speak to a mental health professional. Talking to a therapist, psychologist, or social worker will help you learn how to change the way your depression makes you think, feel, and act. They may recommend talk therapy, either one-on-one or in a group, to help lower your stress and your mood symptoms.

In some case, your mental health professional may prescribe medication to help you manage your symptoms. Talk with your doctor about the benefits and risks of taking medicine if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

Have Questions About Pregnancy and Mental Health?

If you need help dealing with postpartum depression, infertility and mental health, prenatal depression, coping with miscarriage or other pregnancy and mental health concerns, we are here for you. For more information, contact The Center for Treatment of Anxiety and Mood Disorders in Delray Beach, Florida or call us today at 561-496-1094.

Save

Read More
Call Us (561) 496-1094