Can Men Get Postpartum Depression, Too?

Almost everyone knows that new mothers can sometimes go through postpartum depression after the birth of a baby. There are plenty of articles about the subject online and daytime talk shows often discuss the topic. In women, anxiety and depression can be the result of many factors – sleeplessness, a new routine, feeling like you’re losing control, and radical swings in hormone levels all contribute to the “baby blues.” But, while new moms are the usual focus of postnatal depression, what about the new dad? Can men get postpartum depression, too?

While it would seem unlikely, it is not uncommon for new dads to also go through a period of depression after the birth of their child. In fact, in 2010, American Medical Association (AMA) researchers reported that slightly more than 10 percent of new fathers experience paternal postpartum depression (PPND). That figure is roughly twice as high as “regular” depression rates in the general male population.

Postpartum Depression in Men

In February, 2017 JAMA Psychiatry published the results of a New Zealand study of more than 3,500 men who were about to become fathers. These study participants filled out questionnaires when their partners were in their third trimester of pregnancy and answered follow-up questions nine months after the birth of their child.

The researchers found that while some of the new fathers showed signs of depression, this mental disorder was most likely to be present in the men who reported being in fair-to-poor health or under stress during the pregnancy. All in all, about 2.3 percent of the study’s expectant fathers exhibited signs of depression before the birth of the baby.

When the study follow-up was done nine months after the birth of their child, postpartum depression in the new fathers had increased. At this point, 4.3 percent of the men who were participating reported symptoms of PPND. This postpartum depression in men was not only associated with stress during the actual pregnancy, but had risen due to other factors that happened after the birth, such as becoming unemployed, having a prior depression history, or no longer being in a relationship with the child’s mother. It was also no surprise that the men’s risk increased if the baby had health concerns, was colicky and not sleeping well, or if the pregnancy was unplanned.

The AMA study done in 2010 showed that the men’s postpartum depression was highest in the 3 to 6 months after the child’s birth. Interestingly, researchers also noted a correlation to the depression severity within the family. It seems that the new fathers were more likely to experience paternal postnatal depression if the child’s mother also went through postpartum depression.

New Father Depression Symptoms

The indicators of postpartum depression in men are similar to those experienced by women. New father depression symptoms can include some or most of the following:

  • Anger, frustration, mood swings
  • Withdrawal from social activities
  • Poor memory, unable to concentrate
  • Fear that you can’t take care of yourself, your baby, or your baby’s mother
  • Low energy, diminished libido
  • Changes in appetite
  • Sleeping too much or insomnia
  • Feelings of guilt or inability to bond with your child
  • Feeling helpless, sad, or hopeless
  • Physical pain, such as gastrointestinal problems or headaches
  • Lack of interest in your normal activities
  • Poor hygiene, unmotivated to perform personal care routines

Don’t Ignore Paternal Postpartum Depression

Your depression can have a long-term effect on your marriage or relationship, and on your child. There is research that shows the children of men with postpartum depression can have a reduced vocabulary at age two and can have behavioral and emotional issues, as well. Additionally, men with postpartum depression are less apt to spend time playing with or reading to their kids and are more likely to spank their child.

As with women, untreated PPND can last for a long time. Treatment for this type of depression is most likely to involve cognitive behavioral therapy or talk therapy. If needed, it may also include anti-depressant medications.

Even though much is not yet known about paternal postpartum depression, it helps to know there is such a disorder and that you are not alone. It is normal for men to need time to adjust to a new baby, just the same as it is for the new mother. Because men are not as likely as women to seek help, if you or your partner are experiencing some of the new father depression symptoms listed above, it would be wise to speak with a licensed mental health professional who works with men. Remember: it is not a weakness to seek help. Instead, it shows the strength of your commitment to yourself and your family.

Let Us Help

If you are a new father and are going through the symptoms of paternal postnatal depression, the professionals at The Center for Treatment of Anxiety and Mood Disorders in Delray Beach, Florida can help. To get answers to your questions or for more information, contact us or call us today at 561-496-1094.

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For My Anxiety or Depression: Should I Use Medication or Therapy? (Webinar)

About the Webinar:

Dr. Andrew Rosen, Board Certified Psychologist, founder and director of the Center for Treatment of Anxiety and Mood Disorders and Dr. David Gross, Board Certified Psychiatrist, and medical director of the Center recently held a webinar on using medication versus therapy for anxiety and depression with The Anxiety and Depression Association of America. Some of the topics covered in the webinar include: What are the roles of medication and therapy? How can my psychiatrist (or primary care doctor) and my therapist work together as a team? How soon can I expect to see results from medication? How soon can I expect to see results from cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT)? Are there situations where medication and CBT can work great together?

 

Watch the webinar here:

Recorded on April 21, 2017 for the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (www.adaa.org) © ADAA 2017

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Adelphi University’s Psychology Program Ranked #4 Worldwide

The Center for Treatment has team members from some of the top universities in not only the country, but the world! Dr. Andrew Rosen’s alma matter, Adelphi Universtiy’s Gordon F. Derner Institute of Advanced Psychological Studies Studies has been ranked fourth worldwide among psychology and psychoanalysis schools by the Center for World University Rankings (CWUR). Adelphi was ranked #4 worldwide with only the Columbia University, New York University and Harvard University departments of psychology ranking higher on the list. More than 26,000 degree-granting institutions were included in the annual ranking.

Find out more about Adelphi Universities achievement here.

Let Us Help

If you are looking for psychological or psychiatric treatment, The Center for Treatment has a highly skilled staff that is ready to help. For more information, contact us or call us today at 561-496-1094.

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Maternity Leave – Going Back to Work after Baby

One of the hardest things for a new mother on maternity leave to do is go back to work after it ends. You carried your bundle of joy for nine months and have had time off from your job to bond with your child. After taking care of their every need, it can be difficult to turn them over to strangers at a day care center and be separated from your son or daughter for an eight-hour period or longer. And, even if you know the babysitter – maybe it’s your mother-in-law, a friend, or a trusted neighbor – new parents will still go through an adjustment period when maternity leave ends and mom return to their job.

The end of maternity leave means new routines and more work to do. Now you not only have to get yourself up and out to work, you need to get another person ready to go as well. There are clothes and toys, diapers, and possibly special foods or medicines to prepare and pack for the work day. The household chores still need to be done, not to mention tasks like grocery shopping, laundry, or trips to the pediatrician. Deciding which parent will take care of which tasks after the end of maternity leave can be a job all by itself.

Additionally, some new mothers go through postpartum depression. Returning to work can add to their symptoms of crying, mood swings, loss of appetite, the inability to bond with their baby, and the guilt that accompanies this type of depression. If your postpartum depression symptoms don’t lessen after two weeks or if they are getting worse, be sure to call your doctor. Postpartum depression can be successfully treated with psychotherapy, medications, or a combination of the two.

Working Moms – Easing Back into your Job After Maternity Leave

Some working moms experience feelings of guilt for leaving their child with someone else or feel inadequate for not being a “superwoman” capable of handling the stresses of a new baby, new routines, and a new “normal.”

For all the books you can find about expecting a baby or the period immediately following birth, there are few resources that address the emotions and anxiety that going back to work after maternity leave can bring up for a new parent. This period has been called the “fifth trimester,” a term trademarked by Lauren Smith Brody, a former Glamour magazine executive editor. She struggled with returning to work and ultimately wrote a book to help new parents manage their expectations. She describes the shift from maternity leave to working mom as “a monumental transition.”

One of the best ways to help ease this maternity leave transition is to set things in place before the baby comes.

  • Research and arrange for childcare. If you have a babysitter instead of a daycare center, also set up a back-up plan in case the babysitter is ever sick.
  • Establish and practice your morning routine a couple of times, at least a week or two before going back to work. Actually wake up at the time you’ll need to get up for work, then eat, dress, and get your baby ready to go. Build in some “glitch time” for occasions like when the baby spits up just as you’re ready to leave or for the day you can’t find your keys.
  • If you plan to breastfeed, talk to your boss to arrange a schedule and set aside a private area for pumping.
  • Decide on temporary compromises you can make when going back to work after baby. Maybe you can go to sleep earlier, eat prepared meals once or twice a week instead of cooking, or let that load of laundry go until the weekend when you’re more rested.
  • Ask for help. Working moms are essentially doing two jobs: their actual employment job and the work of being a mother. It is not a sign of weakness to ask your spouse, family, or friends for help while you go through this transition.
  • Be kind to yourself. Get in some exercise time to reduce stress (even a little goes a long way), get plenty of rest, and try to spend 15-30 minutes every couple of days just doing something for yourself.
  • Avoid venting at work about the stress you may be feeling at home. That way, your boss doesn’t get the idea that you can’t handle the pressure and start worrying that you’ll quit.

It can be challenging to be a new mother going back to work after baby. One of the things working moms must do is find the balance that allows them to hold a job and maintain their pre-baby life, while also preserving their sanity.

If you are finding this more difficult to do than you thought, remember that the transition after maternity leave takes time. Give yourself an adjustment period. After this interval passes, if you still can’t handle it, it might be time to try working with your boss to discuss other options (example: working from home a couple of days per week) that can allow you to have a realistic balance.

Let Us Help

If you have concerns about maternity leave and going back to work after baby or if you are suffering from the symptoms of postpartum depression, the therapists at The Center for Treatment of Anxiety and Mood Disorders in Delray Beach, Florida are there to help. For more information, contact us or call us today at 561-496-1094.

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Where Will They Be in 10 Years? Exploring Residential and Therapeutic Options For Adolescents & Young Adults

About the Presentation:

Clinicians are often unaware of the range of residential options that exist nationally for their most challenging young clients. We will demystify the antiquated, often misunderstood assumptions about residential treatment programs. We’ll provide a deeper understanding of the options clinicians can propose to their adolescent and young adult patients who need a more intensive milieu.

When:

Tuesday, March 21, 2017
9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Where:

Center for Treatment of Anxiety and Mood Disorders
4600 Linton Blvd, Ste 320
Delray Beach, FL 33445

Register Here

About the Presenters:

Marcy Dorfman, LCSW
Therapeutic Educational Consultant
 

Marcy is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and Therapeutic Educational Consultant. Having treated families clinically, both in agencies and in twenty years of private practice, she recognized the need to work with a Therapeutic Educational Consultant for her own son, then 14, because he was not progressing in outpatient therapy to the extent he needed to reach his full potential. Now working to assist and guide families through the vast array of available options, she travels throughout the country to pinpoint the finest schools and programs based on their programming, staff, and clinical reputation. She shares her invaluable knowledge with parents who are in need of expert advice and direction.

 

 

About Josh Watson, LCSW
Chief Marketing Officer, Aspiro Adventure Therapy
 

Josh completed graduate studies at the University of Georgia and is currently a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Utah and North Carolina. He is a co-founder and Chief Marketing Officer for Aspiro, a Wilderness Adventure Therapy program based in Sandy, Utah. Josh has spent over 15 years of his professional career in the research, development and implementation of effective treatment strategies for both adolescent and young adult populations presenting with mixed emotional, behavioral, and learning challenges. Since the conception of Aspiro in 2005, Josh and the Aspiro Group have successfully developed five additional partner programs in Utah, North Carolina and Costa Rica that each serve different client profiles.

 

Andrew Taylor, CSUDC
Founder & Executive Director, Pure Life by Aspiro

A native of Utah, Andrew grew up in the outdoors and spent his college summers as a river guide on the Upper Colorado River. After graduating from the University of Utah with a degree in Organizational Communication, Andrew went to Costa Rica in search of white water. During his time in Costa Rica, he fell in love with the Costa Rican people and the wide range of adventure activities the country has to offer. Andrew has been running adventure trips in Costa Rica since 2004. He’s rafted and kayaked in rivers all over the world, including Costa Rica, New Zealand, and Venezuela. He has been inspired and fulfilled by his work with individuals suffering from drug and alcohol addictions at Cirque Lodge, one of the top substance abuse programs in the nation.

 

Register Here

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Is There a Connection Between Vaccines and Autism?

Is there a link between vaccines and autism? This question has been at the center of an ongoing debate ever since the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) began reporting that autism was on the rise in the United States and around the world.

Currently, about 1 child out of every 68 will be diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), which is classified as a developmental disability. Whenever there is an increase in a disorder or disability, people start looking for reasons for the change. Since ASD can be seen in a child as young as the age of two, research has focused on the factors early in life that might contribute to an autism diagnosis. From birth, children receive many immunizations, so fears have been raised of a possible connection between these vaccines and autism.

In particular, there have been concerns about the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine and thimerosal, a mercury-based preservative that had been used in MMR and other inoculations. Since 2003, nine studies have been conducted into the relationship between thimerosal and ASD, however the Institute of Medicine has determined there is no link between the vaccine and the development of autism.

In reaction to concerns about whether thimerosal in vaccines and autism were related, the preservative was either removed from vaccines or reduced to negligible amounts between 1999 and 2001. Today, this preservative has been limited to use only in multi-dose vials found in some flu vaccines. If you are still worried, however, you can request your child receive a thimerosal-free vaccine.

Additionally, a 2013 study by the CDC determined there is no link between vaccines and autism. It looked at the number of antigens (they help the body’s immune system fight disease) and found no difference between children with ASD and children without the disorder.

What Causes Autism?

The CDC is currently conducting research to find out if autism has an environmental, biological, or genetic cause. There are many categories of disability along the autism spectrum and, at this time, specialists haven’t found any one specific reason for the development of the disorder.

We do know, however, that there are factors which can indicate a higher chance that a child will develop autism. These components are:

  • Children with autistic siblings are more likely to develop the disability.
  • Children born to older parents are more likely to be at risk.
  • It is thought that the critical developmental time for ASD is in utero, or in the period during or immediately after birth.
  • The prescription medicines valproic acid and thalidomide have been linked to a higher ASD risk in the infant, when these medications were taken during the pregnancy.
  • ASD occurs more often in people who have certain chromosomal or genetic conditions (for example: Fragile X Syndrome).

What are the Early Signs of Autism?

Although autism can affect either gender, the disorder occurs about 4.5 times more often in males than in females. It is found in every socioeconomic, racial, and cultural background, although it is more prevalent in white children than in African-American or Hispanic children.

People with ASD may have problems communicating or interacting with others, or may have difficulty focusing or learning. Additionally, early signs of Autism Spectrum Disorder may include:

  • Lack of interest in objects or in relating to people
  • Avoiding eye contact
  • Preferring to spend time by themselves
  • Becoming upset if routines change
  • Unusual reactions to stimuli, such as smells, tastes, textures, or sounds
  • Repeating words or phrases or repeating actions over and over

Diagnosis, Evaluation, and ASD Treatment

Although there is no cure for ASD, early intercession can reduce the severity of a child’s developmental delays and can teach them important skills. The earlier a child is diagnosed and begins treatment, the better their chances of reaching their full potential. ASD treatment and early intervention can begin as soon as 3 months of age.

If you are concerned about your child and the way they interact with you or others, the way they speak or act, or the way they learn, the first step is to call your child’s pediatrician and discuss your worries. Your child’s doctor can help answer your questions and, if alarmed, should refer you to specialists for further evaluation. Psychologists, psychiatrists, developmental pediatricians, and/or pediatric neurologists are specially trained to assess and diagnose Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Additionally, if you need a free assessment, you can contact your state’s early intervention programs. To find out more about your particular state’s Child Find evaluation, visit the Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center.

Our Children’s Center Can Help

If you have questions about the early signs of autism, treatment and intervention, or have other autism-related concerns, the professionals at our child-focused department, The Children’s Center, can help. For more information, contact the Children’s Center for Psychiatry Psychology and Related Services in Delray Beach, Florida or call us today at (561) 223-6568.

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New Mothers Workshop

New Mothers Workshop

New Mothers & Babies Workshop

Saturday, April 1st 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Click here to register.

Are you adjusting to a being a New Mom? Join the Boca Pediatric Group and Dr. KC Charette, Clinical Psychologist from The Center for Treatment of Anxiety & Mood Disorders for a free 1-hour workshop on adjusting to being a new mom and to having a new baby. Join us to learn about the adjustment process and to meet other new moms. Babies are welcome too, of course!

Click here for more information on this free workshop.

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ADHD and Anxiety – Is There a Relationship?

Do ADHD and anxiety go hand in hand?

If you have been diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder, you may also be experiencing challenges with anxiety. But, what is it about these conditions that causes them to occur together?

ADHD Facts

By now nearly everyone has heard of Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHA). ADHD is a mental illness that is thought to be biological in nature. ADHA is the same as Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) – the name that was originally used when people first became aware of the disorder. Although the names are often used interchangeably, the most current name is ADHD.

ADHD symptoms include:

  • an inability to focus
  • restlessness
  • disorganization
  • difficulty completing tasks
  • impulsive behavior
  • hyperactivity in children, although this behavior tends to diminish in adulthood

You do not have to experience all of these symptoms to have Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder.

How common is ADHD? Statistics show that about 11 million adults (about 5% of the USA’s population) have the condition. However, less than 20% of adults who have the disorder have actually been diagnosed and, of those identified adults, only about 25% have pursued treatment. People who were diagnosed in childhood often continue to experience symptoms in adulthood – about two thirds of children with the condition will continue to require some form of treatment in their adult life. Additionally, while we used to think the disorder only affected males, we now know females can have ADHD.

Can You Have Both ADHD and Anxiety?

Experiencing ADHD and anxiety is more common than you may think. Somewhere between 30% and 50% of adults with ADHD will also have some type of anxiety disorder. These disorders can range anywhere from generalized anxiety or social anxiety to panic disorder, phobias, and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD).

The reason anxiety is so common in conjunction with ADHD is twofold. First, there is a theory that both ADD and anxiety disorders may carry a genetic component. Having a close relative with either condition can increase your chances of being diagnosed with their same disorder. Additionally, research is being conducted to find out if there is an environmental component that triggers both conditions, such as exposure to lead or toxins.

The second reason is that having the disorder is stressful and can lead to feeling overwhelmed and vulnerable. When you worry about things like possibly forgetting a work deadline or when your symptoms affect your relationships or daily activities, you may feel angry or disappointed. Being upset and anxious can make it more difficult to seek help and may cause people to stay in their comfortable but potentially ineffective patterns.

Anxiety and ADHD Treatment

Because ADHD is a brain-based disorder, it is generally treated with medication to help normalize brain function. The challenge to treatment with medicine, however, is that some ADHD prescriptions can worsen the symptoms of anxiety in some patients.

Ideally, a combined approach to anxiety and ADHD treatment works best. This should include Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) or another form of mindfulness based therapy, in addition to medication. These therapies provide coping techniques: learning these skills can be an invaluable tool to help you stay positive about change.

Undergoing CBT can help you improve productivity, learn to be accountable, and can aid in identifying and achieving goals. Additionally, support groups and talk therapy can help you come to terms with the interpersonal effects the disorder can bring. Feelings of shame, guilt, failure, and their resulting stress can be reduced by processing them in a friendly, compassionate setting.

There also are some steps you can take at home to help improve your symptoms:

  • Exercise regularly (30 minutes per day) to decrease anxiety.
  • Create schedules to help stay on task.
  • Get seven to eight hours of sleep per night. Being well-rested helps reduce anxiety.
  • Identify your triggers and work with your therapist to learn coping strategies.
  • Practice relaxation techniques, such as meditation or deep breathing.
  • Decrease your stress and surround yourself with positive, supportive people.
  • Try to minimize worry and negative thinking.

If You Have Questions, We Can Help

If you have questions or need help managing your ADHD and anxiety, the therapists at The Center for Treatment of Anxiety and Mood Disorders in Delray Beach, Florida are there to help. For more information, contact us or call us today at 561-496-1094.

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